The present and future of post production business and technology | Philip Hodgetts

CAT | Artificial Intelligence

If you’re not going to be at IBC then move on, but if you’re going you’ll probably want to be at the FCP X World Event, particularly on Saturday at 12:15 and Sunday at 2:15 when Lumberjack System will be previewing the latest addition to the Lumberjack family. (more…)

By AI I mean Machine Learning! Some of the discussion around Larry’s post and my response has been about data sets. Norm Hollyn noted in the comments that there were non-training options “under NDA”.  Here’s a good discussion on the types of training data, or lack of need, from TechCrunch.

Larry Jordan got on his (self described) soap box this morning with a thoughtful post about the future of editing in an AI infested world. I think we should all be aware of what’s happening, and I’ve certainly been trying to do my part there, as recent posts attest, but I’m not sure I’m quite as concerned about editing jobs as Larry is. Assistants perhaps.

Larry shared his post with me, asking for feedback, and having written a fairly comprehensive response, I decided to share it here as well. While I mostly address the areas where AI/Machine Learning might be used, and why pervasive automated editing is probably way further in the future than Larry’s concern would indicate, none of that negates Larry’s excellent advice on managing your career.

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The report isn’t clear on exactly how Watson’s “AI” is being used but the article says that they are “now curating the biggest sights and sounds from matches to create “Cognitive Highlights,” which will be seen on Wimbledon’s digital channels.”

Apparently using Watson cognitive services to recognize a significant moment, and pull it together with cheers and social media comments to make a 2 minute video.

The AI platform will literally take key points from the tennis matches (like a player serving an ace at 100 mph), fans’ cheers and social media content to help create up to two-minute videos. The two-week tourney at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, complete with a Google Doodle to celebrate Wimbledon’s 140th anniversary, began Monday.

 

Adobe is heading into AI/Machine Learning full steam ahead. A private room NAB demo showed picture search and dialog search powered by IBM Watson, and now this collaboration with Stanford organizes takes, matches them to lines of dialog, recognizes voices, faces and emotions, camera framing, and more and then builds dialog-focused stories in any style desired.

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Jun/17

15

AI and Creativity

What is creativity? Nick Stockton examined the question in an article at Wired about the use of an Artificial Intelligence (really Machine Learning) based collaborator in creativity.  Beyond discussing the nature of creativity from a couple of perspectives it looks at the role of machines as collaborators.

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Design is much more than the way things look. It encompasses every aspect of every interaction with the device, object or software package you’re using. Josh Clark published a talk he gave on behalf of his design studio big medium, that is focused on design in the era of the algorithm, or Artificial Intelligence.

It’s a very long and deep article, well worth the read if you design anything at all. I found it very relevant as we are currently designing our most complex and powerful app. Read on for a list of the topics.

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Jun/17

7

What Jobs will be lost to AI/Robots?

A new Market Watch article spells out the results of a study that pulled data from an employment report from University of Oxford, processed into a visual chart by Visual Capitalist.

Not surprising, but retail service jobs are likely to do poorly, while high-touch occupations like nursing and teaching are likely to remain. Overall – and quite unfortunately for society – most of the job losses will be among relatively unskilled workers.

While there have been huge disruptions to employment in the past, there have been new jobs created, which is hard to foresee from this chart.

Consider the chart a career planning guide! I’m somewhat relieved that “Software Developers and Programmers” are relatively safe, although surprised as code is increasingly written by code! There is a surprising amount of creativity that goes into designing the software, that isn’t directly related to the code, so I guess that’s the safe part?

There isn’t a direct category that I could slot production and post production into, but since creativity in general will be valued, I think that creativity will continue to be valued. On the other hand, relatively routine tasks like organization and preparing for editing is likely to be vulnerable.

For an indication of when the jobs will disappear, consider this article about a paper: “When Will AI Exceed Human Performance? Evidence from AI Experts.” In this study, experts where asked their expectation as to when jobs would be eliminated. Bottom line, they could all be gone in 125 years.

We were watching the WWDC keynote address last night and the term “Machine Learning” came up so ofter, that if you were taking a shot each time, it would have been very detrimental to your health. There were at least 12-15 references during the 2.25 hour keynote.

Apple have seriously embraced Machine Learning/Deep Learning across many apps and have introduced a Machine Learning framework for running developer designed learning algorithms, even providing conversion tools for migrating from other AI platforms.

Or course, this comes as no surprise, as I wrote about the many ways Apple were integrating machine learning back in October 2016.

UPDATE: Wired also noticed just how key Machine Learning has become to Apple.

I’ve written here before, and Terry Curren and I have discussed repeated on The Terence and Philip Show, that many jobs are likely to be replaced by the combination of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics/Automation. It’s good to see people thinking and writing about these things, as does Caitlin Fitzsimmons of the Sydney Morning Herald (Australia), in an article – How to prepare for the jobs of the future when you don’t know what they are – that features an interview with Pulitzer prize-winning author and New York Times columnist, Thomas Friedman, who writes about the age of acceleration in his new book, Thank You For Being Late.

The whole article (and likely the book, which I’m about to buy) are worth the read, but I loved this paragraph from Ms Fitzsimmons:

That’s because the only way to equip children for the future of work is to develop their imagination, creativity and emotional intelligence. If the world is changing, the best thing you can do is equip them for change. They need to be emotionally resilient with a habit of self-directed lifelong learning.

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