The Principles of Television 3.0

1. There is an open, unmediated marketplace between producers and viewers where viewers compensate producers directly.

2. Production values do count: at a minimum they make the communication visible, audible and so the editing won’t make the target audience nauseas.

3. High production values are not the be all and end all, there will be outstanding product that breaks all the rules and makes a fortune because it’s popular.

4. Prices paid for content will trend down.

5. More people will earn a living from this new model of Television, overall more money than is earned now by the existing ‘Television Producers’. This likely means that fewer people will get mega rich but more people into a “middle class” of producers, making a good income meeting their market.

6. It can be profitable to meet the entertainment, education (or a mixture) needs of audiences from 250,000 to 1 million, which is the new mass market. Smaller audiences can be profitable if they serve a niche well.

7. Simplicity and convenience can compete with free. It can compete particularly well in open marketplaces where otherwise trends downward in revenues would unfortunate.

8. There is a role for non-television, done-for-the-fun-of-it with no expectation of profit, but for the fame of it. Production values will count less, and poor production values would never stop a video going viral.

9. The rise of the citizen journalist with easy visual verification tools – still and video cameras everywhere – makes for more openness and honesty in the political and social realms. Citizen Journalists form a new line in the defense of Democracy and the US way of life from those who would subvert. They form a Fifth Estate, behind Executive, Legislative, Judiciary and Press.

10. Programming styles will evolve outside the constrains of parallel programming and “half hour” or “hour” programming blocks. If programming is viewed on viewers’ schedules it can be whatever duration serves the story of that episode.

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