Category Archives: Distribution

Digital Distribution issues

AI, Machine Learning and Distribution Content Metadata

Well, from a couple of days of reading and email newsletters, but there is quite a focus.

MESA Alliance quotes Deluxe Entertainment Services Group chief product offer Andy Shenkler as saying:

“AI is obviously playing a fairly broad role, especially with the areas that we at Deluxe are working on,” he told the Media & Entertainment Services Alliance (MESA) in a phone interview. That includes “everything from the post-production creation process, localization” around advanced language detection and auto translation – “and then even down into the distribution side of things,” he said, noting the latter was “probably the least well-known and discussed” part of the equation.

That article goes on to talk about who’s technologies they use and how they use it to assign metadata to incoming assets. Speaking of Content Metadata (in this case about finished content, not for use in production) Roz Ho, senior vice president and general manager, consumer and metadata at TIVO, writes in a guest blog at Multichannel News:

Not only does machine learning help companies keep up with the tsunami of content, it can better enrich metadata and enable distributors to get the right entertainment in front of the right viewers at the right time.

Machine learning takes metadata beyond cast, title and descriptions, and enables content to be enhanced with many new data descriptors such as keywords, dynamic popularity ratings, and moods, to name a few.

Liz finishes with a short dissertation on how these machines, and people enhanced by them, will be the direction we take in the future.

And out of CES some headlines:

CES 2018: Consumer Technology Association Expects Major Growth for AI in 2018

CES 2018: AI Touted Heavily by LG, Samsung, Byton on Eve of CES

It seems like every day there is news yet another application of Machine Learning (AI) into the Media and Entertainment space, either in production – where it is helping decide what goes in to production as well as helping in production – through to helping people find more appropriate content.

Kids Just Want to be a YouTube Star

An article on Tubefilter caught my eye: The Most-Desired Career Among Young People Today Is ‘YouTuber’ (Study).

The top 10 jobs kids want, per the First Choice study, are as follows: YouTuber, blogger/vlogger, musician/singer, actor, filmmaker, doctor/nurse, TV presenter, athlete/teacher, writer, and lawyer.

The one thing that the top jobs have in common is fame!

The thing is, it works. Not for everyone but it works.

Continue reading Kids Just Want to be a YouTube Star

Are Silicon Valley and Hollywood in opposition to each other?

A recent comment in an article on CNET.com caught my eye:

“If I owned a studio, I’d make movie theaters pay me,” says Dana Brunetti, producer of “House of Cards” and “The Social Network.”

Needles to say I had to read the article. First note was that this comment was in the context of a web focused conference, so there may be an element of “playing to the audience”, but in essence the argument is that more online/web companies should follow Netflix (and Amazon, Google and Apple) into producing more original content.

With online and technology-based companies already threatening traditional distribution methods, the impact would be huge: “Once Silicon Valley can create content as well,” said Brunetti, “they’ll own it soup to nuts.”

I can’t argue with that. More original production means more jobs in the industry. (And yes, more clients for my day job’s business.)

What appeals to me is the push for “per program” content purchase. As long as the pricing issue is solved. It should cost no more (over a month) for a la carte purchases of limited programming, than it is for a full cable subscription.

Forbes says the cable model is unsustainable and unpopular

The Forbes article, Cable TV Model Not Just Unpopular But Unsustainable starts with a putative outline of a cable business: essentially “keep hiking the rates, have terrible service”! Finishing with this “goal”:

 If all goes as described, we should be able to consistently deliver customer satisfaction levels that rank among the lowest of any industry. 

Now that’s not a business model I’d want to emulate!

Continue reading Forbes says the cable model is unsustainable and unpopular

Even more Original Programming Sources

While the money spent on broadcast and cable production is reducing, threatened by tighter budgets imposed by shrinking audiences in the face of more diversity in programming sources, it’s great to see that there are others stepping into the gap. Obviously Netflix, who plan on spending $2 billion a year on original programming, but there are many other original programming sources coming down the pipe.

Continue reading Even more Original Programming Sources