Small Production Footprint: Lighting and Grip

Lighting

My primary choice for lighting was to go with LitePanels LED lights (and of course flexible reflectors). The LitePanels Micro, Mini Pro and Croma were the perfect choice. All the reasons you’d go for LED in the first place – low power consumption, low heat and small size – worked for us, plus the ability to vary the output down to “just enough” to fill in facial shadows, made them perfect. We particularly loved the Croma’s ability to dial in just the right color temperature. Also important for our journey was that they ran on standard, rechargeable AA batteries. To be disposing of hundreds of batteries would not have sat well with Solar Odyssey’s “green” message. Continue reading Small Production Footprint: Lighting and Grip

Small Production Footprint: Cameras

Cameras

My choice of cameras were from Sony: a single NEX FS100 and three NEX7 DSLRs. (One DSLR was destined for the helicopter platform that never eventuated leaving it spare.) I totally love these cameras, even with their kit lenses. The NEX7s are a great camera and I’ll be keeping at least one for future personal use – for both still and video use. Audio quality is good enough to use to sync with second system audio, or with a directional microphone, good enough for field voice recording. Continue reading Small Production Footprint: Cameras

What I learned about working with a small production footprint: Introduction

Now that Solar Odyssey is over for me, I thought it was a good time to look back at the equipment choices and whether or not I’d make the same choices again. As it turned out, I ended up producing a different show than the one that I was preparing for, which was largely based on a solar powered boat. As it turned out, we never tested the workflow on the boat (as we never actually got on the boat). Continue reading What I learned about working with a small production footprint: Introduction

JavaScript video technology only 17 years in the making

JavaScript video technology only 17 years in the making http://t.co/t1FCSNf7 Not sure why this is relevant, but you might have an idea!

Yes, the lack of need for a browser plug-in is good, but that’s the role of HTML5 which has largely standardized on H.264/MP4 (thank goodness). It will be hard to win against the momentum behind HTML5 and frankly I’d prefer there not to be another alternative, now that we have finally got something like a standard.

Personally, I think this is an interesting technology looking for a reason to exist. I find the claims of “90% less bandwidth” to be suspect at best, and the company provides no details on their site (that I could find).

 

Pixorial, Rumblefish in tune on copyright-cleared soundtracks

Pixorial, Rumblefish in tune on copyright-cleared soundtracks http://t.co/enGAmtMF.

This is a new deal between online video platform provideo Pixorial and Rumblefish:

gives Pixorial users access to the “world’s largest copyright-cleared soundtrack catalog,” the two companies said in a news release.

So, it’s a new source of licensed music for your video – if you use Pixorial’s platform.

New MPEG Standard – H.265 – What does it mean?

Australian news website ITwire, has an article up about the MPEG’s announcement of the draft standard of their next generation of video codec, due to replace H.264 over time. Hopefully now that we’ve mostly settled on H.264 as the “one codec to rule them all” it will be a comfortable transition to the next generation. Continue reading New MPEG Standard – H.265 – What does it mean?