The present and future of post production business and technology | Philip Hodgetts

CAT | The Business of Production

Once upon a time it was easy to differentiate between Film and TV production: film was shot on film, TV was shot electronically. SAG looked after the interests of Screen Actors (film) while AFTRA looked after the interests of Television actors. That the two actors unions have merged is indicative of the changes in production technology.

As is noted in an article at Digital Trends, there is almost no difference between the technologies used in both styles of production, so what are the differences? It comes down to two thing, which are really the same thing.

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This interview was recorded a couple of months back, and I’ve been waiting for it to come out, as I think it’s one of my three favorite times as interview subject of all time, along with recent interviews on That Post Show (Episode 13) and FCPX Grill. This one is interesting because it focuses more on my adventures in business rather than production or post production. Apparently during the interview I talk about (from Scott’s description, not my own):

  • How to recover when forces outside of your control destroy your entire business model.
  • Moaning and complaining is a rather poor business approach.
  • To always be on the look-out for new opportunities.
  • When to tell your clients to go pound sand.
  • How to concentrate on things to advance your company’s goals.
  • That marketing is education.
  • What is the best way to eat a giant animal.

The Podcast’s full name is The Video Crush with Scott Markowitz and I’m up in Episode 3.

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A new show in which we discuss 4K. http://www.theterenceandphilipshow.com/?p=546

Avid folk – hi Frank – have been promoting this survey result that purportedly shows that Media Composer  is used more than all other NLEs. In fact the article starts off with:

Avid Media Composer remains the most popular editing system in production by a considerable margin. It’s the primary editing system of 70% of our respondents, proving that it still rules the roost despite the challenge from Apple and Adobe

Which is hardly accurate if you really examine the subject. In fact is bordering on deliberately misleading.

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Aug/14

15

More “New Studio” Production

In recent announcements, Amazon Studios debuts five pilots in their third wave of original programming. Meanwhile Netflix is going for humor in a series of comedy specials.

The more funding opportunities, the more production is done and that’s good for all of us.

After a long period going back over accounts without reporting, we are finally going to be able to get an insight into how Avid’s financial position is looking. With the revised plan to publish restated accounts for 2011, accounts for 2012, and 2013. Within 40 days of that, the figures to June 2014 will be published.

I look forward to having a detailed look at the company’s financial position.

Yesterday I had to pleasure of being invited to USC for Avid’s Avid Everywhere presentation. Shortly thereafter I attempted to share what I learnt with Larry Jordan and Michael Horton on the Digital Production BuZZ. Avid friends, I hope I got it close to right!

Here’s the link to my segment on the BuZZ. http://www.digitalproductionbuzz.com/BuZZ_Audio/Buzz_140731_Hodgetts.mp3

Jul/14

29

Amazon is a Studio too?

It seems that every content distribution company has decided that original content is the way forward. Amazon’s recent announcement that they would spend $100 million on original production adds to Apple’s UK music festival, Netflix and Google’s original programming. Google are spending on YouTube production as well.

In context though… $100 million would buy you two seasons of Mad Men.

One of my non-metadata interests is in food, so I read a lot of food related articles, including this one where Anthony Bourdain talks about the foodie revolution. What stood out was this comment after discussing the traditional way a talented young chef might make their way through the kitchen hierarchy over decades, vs the modern “democratized” approach where a talented young chef just ups  – maybe via a food truck – and gets their career started.

“A lot of old-school guys complain about this—you’re not paying your dues. That’s the downside. The upside is interesting people with something to say and a unique worldview can actually get their name out there and open a place with relative ease compared to the way it used to be.”

This reminds me of modern production: it’s been democratized to the point where, if you have an idea, you can make it happen.

In this episode Terence and Philip discuss NAB 2014: Avid’s direction, AJA’s new camera, drones and cars that drive themselves, the new Dolby monitor, NAB excitement levels, and Lumberjack System.

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