The present and future of post production business and technology | Philip Hodgetts

Jan/16

3

A year of software updates: 2015

In total, Intelligent Assistance Software released 76 updates to our apps:

  • 16 for XtoCC
  • 13 for 7toX
  • 14 for Sync-N-Link X
  • 16 for Producer’s Best Friend
  • 4 for Change List X
  • 10 for Sequence Clip Reporter
  • 2 for Sync-N-Link

and even one update for prEdit!

Not to mention a completely rewritten and enhanced backLogger, and the transcript features for Lumberyard, for Lumberjack System.

I’d started writing about the inevitability of vertical video, and how we should adapt to it, when what should came up in the Frame.io blog but Say yes to vertical video.

I had come to the realization that fighting against vertical video is not a winnable battle, simply because most people really don’t care. They shoot on a mobile device, and that’s where they view it. Most mobile phones and tablets default to vertical video. Every non-industry person I interact with shoots vertical video: from my singing teach to my niece!

UPDATE: On Twitter Kenneth X or @Knesaren pointed me to an article on How Norwegian Broadcasting made the first vertical video documentary. As always, start with a good story!

UPDATE 2: Clark Dunbar of Mammoth HD tells me that they’ve had large format (HD to 6K) vertical footage for well over a decade for signage, POS and museum installations! Their vertical stock footage gallery is at http://www.mammothhd.com/MHD_QG_VertPort.html.

UPDATE 3: Carl [email protected] on Twitter, had some thoughts on vertical video today:

Vertical video haters keep this in mind: For centuries artist have used the vertical format to represent human presence intimately.

Perhaps that explains why many people (not cinematographers) are naturally drawn to the vertical. It’s not laziness as some scoff.

Rather, think about a mother who films her child. Subconsciously she goes for the vertical to intimately capture her child filling the frame.

To the mother, that’s the most natural thing in the world. Try to overcome your prejudices as a creative and see things as others do.

UPDATE 4: There’s a vertical film festival in Katoomba, Australia. Makes sense, that’s a very mountainous region!

Jan/16

1

2015: It was a good year

2014 was a pretty good year for Greg and I. Getting our first screen credit on Gone Girl and the release of Focus where we were able to make significant contributions were definitely the highlights. At the beginning of 2015 I had only the most basic idea of “family history video” and neither Lunch with Philip and Greg nor The semiSerious Foodies were more than an idea in my head.

My singing “career” entailed three concert performances, and – perhaps a first ever – a custom song with words appropriate for ‘custom metadata’ opened my Content Metadata session at The FCP X Creative Expo in June. Perhaps the biggest surprise was that we are only days away from closing on our first house together. Something completely unplanned at the beginning of the year. It was also the year I filed US Citizenship, having been a permanent resident since 2008.

(more…)

If there was a theme to 2015 in production technology, it would be that this was the year of more. More pixels – 4K and beyond; more dynamic range with HDR video; more field of view as VR establishes; and more programming sources as Netflix et. al. become fully fledged ‘networks’.

(more…)

Dec/15

30

Success requires failure!

A new article in Scientific American – Why Creativity is a Numbers Game – hits on themes that resonate with me. The point of the article is that even famous creators like Edison and Steve Jobs have many failures as well as their prominent successes. In fact, even Shakespeare was remarkably inconsistent in his creative output.

Problematically, most of us are scared of failure, or at least want to avoid it, so we never get past the point where we suck – always at the beginning – and start to improve.

Back in 2009 I wrote an article – What is the role of “failure” in innovation – where I explored the role of ‘failure’ in my own career. It seems relevant again.

 

 

Dec/15

16

Lunch with Michael Horton

Michael Horton’s  career is well documented – the first of our guests with a Wikipedia entry. Michael is also one of my longest standing and closest friends. We met at a LACPUG meeting long before I moved to the USA and he endeared himself to us when he was the first to review The DV Companion for Final Cut Pro back in 1999.

Michael Horton Key Image

(more…)

Dec/15

3

Lunch with Philip and Greg

In this edition Cirina Catania turns the tables and takes Philip Hodgetts and Greg Clarke to lunch. You can find out all you want about Philip on this blog or with a Google search. Greg Clarke has a PhD in Medical Research but chose a career of entrepreneurship over medical research, becoming ‘Friday boss’ in Philip’s Australian business. He is now the co-develper and coding partner for Intelligent Assistance and Lumberjack System.

Philip and Greg have been together as a couple for nearly 25 years, and married in California in 2008.

(more…)

Nov/15

17

Lunch with Patrick Palmer

Recorded in Munich in September, our next lunch guest is full time dad, and some-time product manager for Adobe, Patrick Palmer.

Patrick key image 1

Currently on paternity leave, Patrick Palmer will be returning to his role as Sr. Product Manager, Color Workflows. Patrick came to Adobe via the purchase of Iridas. Our interview covers the formation of Iridas, and a whole lot more.

(more…)

Oct/15

29

Lunch with Maxim Jago

Maxim Jago is a media trainer, presenter, award-winning writer, and film director. He’s also an Adobe Master Trainer and author. He presents regularly at media events, has trained editors all around the world, and has taught everyone from schoolchildren to university professors, from ABC’s top editors in Australia to the BBC’s tech gurus in the UK. Visit his website at http://www.maximjago.com.

Maxim Key Image

Maxim Jago began directing at 16, and studied film at the Bournemouth and Pool College of Art and Design, and then the Farnham Art college (later named the Surrey Institute of Art & Design). While studying, he worked continually on new projects, trying new roles and collaborating with all comers. After leaving Farnham, he embarked on a series of short films, going on to produce and direct Trust Me, a feature length documentary about the work of abstract theatre director, Richard Foreman.

Our longest lunch definitely covered the widest range of topics.

(more…)

In the latest Terence and Philip Show, Terence and Philip talk about Lunch with Philip and Greg; what it is and the 4K, small production kit approach that allows the show to be produced over lunch in regular restaurants. The discussion moves to other production and why we got into the business in the first place before discussing the future of motion graphics in the era of templatorization. (Motion VFXStupid RaisinsFiverr).

Terence and Philip answer some listener questions, including “Where do we compromise, and where can we not compromise” and “When is too much media is enough”.

<< Latest posts

Older posts >>

June 2016
M T W T F S S
« May    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930